Category Archives: Black Shadows and Through the White Looking Glass

Prison Walls v. Love — Review of “Memoirs of a Prison Lawyer/Prison Wife,” by Claudette Spencer-Nurse

Memoirs of a Prison Lawyer/Prison Wife, by Claudette Spencer-Nurse, is a love story.  It is an improbable love story.  It is a love story that has defied the odds.  It is a love story for the ages.  It is a … Continue reading

Posted in Amadou Diallo, Black Shadows and Through the White Looking Glass, crime, Family, Justice Chronicles, Life Sentences, Parole, parole board, police involved shooting, police-involved killing, race, Reentry, Relationships, remorse | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

This day in history — April 23, 1899 — Sam Hose Lynched in Newnan, Georgia

In January 1899, five Palmetto, Georgia, businesses were destroyed by two fires of unknown cause. Though there was no evidence to support the theory, white residents quickly concluded that the fires were set by black conspirators intent on destroying property … Continue reading

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This day in history — April 13, 1947 — Civil Rights Activist Bayard Rustin Arrested in North Carolina

On June 3, 1946, the Supreme Court in Morgan v. Virginia declared unconstitutional state laws that segregated interstate passengers on motor carriers. Shortly thereafter, the decision was interpreted to apply to interstate train and bus travel. The executive committee of … Continue reading

Posted in Black Shadows and Through the White Looking Glass, crime, Justice Chronicles, Lest We Forget, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

This day in history — April 9, 1865 – Lee Surrenders to Grant at Appomattox Court House

On April 9, 1865, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered his approximately 28,000 troops to Union General Ulysses S. Grant in the front parlor of Wilmer McLean’s home in Appomattox Court House, Virginia, effectively ending the Civil War. Less than … Continue reading

Posted in Black Shadows and Through the White Looking Glass, Lest We Forget, Patriotism, race, Slavery, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

This day in history — April 7, 1712 — Enslaved People Revolt in New York City

In 1712, New York City had a large enslaved population and the city’s whites feared the threat of rebellion. Enslaved people in New York City suffered many of the same brutal punishments and methods of control faced by their counterparts … Continue reading

Posted in Black Shadows and Through the White Looking Glass, race, raising black boys, Slavery, Urban Impact | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

All creeps, catcallers are not Men of Color

Remember the video posted about two weeks ago by Hollaback, which showed a white woman, casually dressed, walking the streets of New York City and being catcalled, etc? It shows mostly Black men and Latinos engaging in this behavior. Another … Continue reading

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Excerpt from my book, “Black Shadows and Through the White Looking Glass: Remembering Things Past and Present”

From George Washington to George Bush. From the birth of a nation to a kinder, gentler nation. From Thomas Jefferson to William Jefferson Clinton. From Democratic Republicanism to the New Democrats. From honest Abe to tricky Dick to Slick Willie. … Continue reading

Posted in Black patriotism, Black Shadows and Through the White Looking Glass, John F. Kennedy, Politics, Revolution, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment